XX Biannual Symposium on
MEASURING TECHNIQUES IN TURBOMACHINERY
Transonic and Supersonic Flow in Cascades and Turbomachines
23-24 September, 2010, Milano - Italy

LFM - Laboratorio di Fluidodinamica delle Macchine

Energy Department

Politecnico di Milano

AUTHOR RESOURCES

Papers:
Contributions should concentrate on the development and experience in measurement techniques in the context of turbomachines. Emphasis should be put on ongoing research and in the proposed procedure, and not on the detailed description of the results. All abstracts should be written according to the template provided (check the link at the end of the page), and submitted in pdf format. A typical abstract should be self contained as a description of the research work, between 600 to 800 words long including figures and tables.
Following the review comments, the final version of the papers (no more than 8-10 pages) should be produced by the 1st of September using the same template and in pdf format.

The proposed topics for this Symposium edition are as follows:

  • Experimental techniques and data-reduction methods: novel concepts, advanced optical and time-resolved instrumentation, MEMS, test rig design, novel mathematical methods applied to experimental data, experimental aero-acoustics.
  • Industrial application of advanced measurement techniques: performance measurements, high temperature instrumentation, engine deterioration measurement.
Download Template .doc

Presentations:
The aim of the papers is to allow participants to get a good overview of the range of research activities and problems encountered. It is hoped that this will encourage discussions and interaction between participants. The presentation should not exceed 15 minutes, to allow 10 minutes for further discussion. Presentations should focus on the description and analysis of novel experimental techniques rather than on discussion of experimental data, experimental facilities or standard measurement equipment (except if used to demonstrate the advantages/disadvantages of a new measurement technique).